Detail of Daguerreotype showing deterioration in cover glass

RESEARCH

RESEARCH

"It was helpful to have a conservator for our projects who understood the possibilities of research, which photographs might be suitable for analysis and could help with interpreting the results". P.W.

Photographs sometimes require further investigation for identification and historical purposes, or to revise or develop new treatments. Every research project is different so please contact me if you think I can help.

I always continue to develop my knowledge and I have been fortunate to have been involved with some very productive and interesting research projects. In 1995, I initiated an audience programme in the UK for the examination of the pioneering work at the Smithsonian Institution into the effect of the environment and cold storage on photographs, through the assistance of the Museums and Galleries Commission, the National Museum of Wales, Historic Scotland and the National Science and Media Museum. In the early 1990s, I was frustrated by the lack of adequate treatments and knowledge about the deterioration and conservation of glass where it was used for photographs. After receiving photographs from the National Trust for conservation which required further analysis and the development of new conservation techniques, I initiated a research project which included research in the Physics Department at the University of York. This resulted in my being awarded the Museums and Galleries Commission Jerwood Conservation Award for Research and Innovation for my work on wet collodion positives on glass in 1996. This work was later published in Studies in Conservation, the Journal of the International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works in 1998. I have also been the Conservator for the Collaborative Research Project between the National Science and Media Museum and the Getty Conservation Institute (USA) looking at the characteristics of different photographic processes and was also the Conservator for their Nicéphore Niépce project, investigating the world’s earliest photographs. I have continued to pursue my interests in glass in photography and have pioneered a number of new approaches to the conservation of these photographs. I have taught these in institutions across the world.